Frederick W. Horn

Frederick William Horn (August 21, 1815 January 15, 1893) was a German-Americanimmigrant, lawyer, and politician. He was the 4th, 7th, and 25th Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly. He represented Ozaukee County for a total of 14 years in the Assembly and served as a senator in the first three sessions of the Wisconsin State Senate.

German-American immigrant, politician, 4th, 7th, and 25th Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly
Frederick W. Horn
4th, 7th, and 25th Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly
In office
January 13, 1875  January 12, 1876
Preceded by Gabriel Bouck
Succeeded by Sam Fifield
In office
January 11, 1854  January 10, 1855
Preceded by Henry L. Palmer
Succeeded by Charles C. Sholes
In office
January 8, 1851  January 14, 1852
Preceded by Moses M. Strong
Succeeded by James McMillan Shafter
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
from the 33rd district
In office
January 14, 1891  January 15, 1893
Preceded by Peter Lochen
Succeeded by Stephen F. Mayer
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
from the 11th district
In office
June 5, 1848  January 8, 1851
Preceded by Position Established
Succeeded by Harvey G. Turner
Mayor of Cedarburg, Wisconsin
In office
April 1885  April 1892
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Ozaukee district
In office
January 12, 1887  January 14, 1891
Preceded by John J. Race
Succeeded by William Henry Fitzgerald
In office
January 11, 1882  January 10, 1883
Preceded by Charles G. Meyer
Succeeded by John J. Race
In office
January 9, 1867  January 13, 1869
Preceded by James McCarthy
Succeeded by Job Haskell
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Ozaukee 2nd district
In office
January 13, 1875  January 12, 1876
Preceded by Adolphus Zimmermann
Succeeded by William Carbys
In office
January 10, 1872  January 8, 1873
Preceded by Position Established
Succeeded by Adolphus Zimmermann
In office
January 12, 1859  January 9, 1861
Preceded by Alexander M. Alling
Succeeded by William F. Opitz
In office
January 14, 1857  January 13, 1858
Preceded by William Vogenitz
Succeeded by Alexander M. Alling
In office
January 11, 1854  January 10, 1855
Preceded by Position Established
Succeeded by William H. Ramsey
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Washington 1st district
In office
January 8, 1851  January 14, 1852
Preceded by Solon Johnson
Succeeded by Simon D. Powers
Chairman of the Ozaukee County Board of Supervisors
In office
April 1889  January 15, 1893
Personal details
Born (1815-08-21)August 21, 1815
Linum, Brandenburg, Prussia
Died January 15, 1893(1893-01-15) (aged 77)
Cedarburg, Wisconsin, U.S.
Resting place Cedarburg Cemetery
Cedarburg, Wisconsin
Political party Democratic
(Sometime Independent Democrat)
Spouse(s)
Adelheid Schaelher

(m. 1845; died 1849)

Minna Schaper

(m. 18501893)

Children Bertha B. (Zaun)
(b. 1850; died 1918)
Clara
(b. 1853; died 1900)
Ernestine
(b. 1856; died 1875)
William
(b. 1859; died 1927)
Minna
(b. 1861; died 1900)
Alex W.
(b. 1862; died 1919)
Johanna (Altenhofen)
(b. 1866; died 1932)

. . . Frederick W. Horn . . .

Horn was born in Linum, in the Province of Brandenburg, in what was then the Kingdom of Prussia (now Germany). He was educated in Berlin, at the Gymnasium of the Gray Friar, but did not graduate, and entered the military service of Prussia.

He emigrated to the United States in 1836, first residing in New York state, then making his way west in 1837. He made his residence in Michigan but traveled extensively through Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and finally Wisconsin. He arrived in Milwaukee, in the Wisconsin Territory, in 1840 and, in 1841, settled in Mequon, in what was then Washington County. He resided here until his final move, to the neighboring community of Cedarburg, in 1847. He practiced law in Cedarburg and served as Mayor. He also served on the Ozaukee CountyBoard of Supervisors and was editor of the Cedarburg Weekly News.

In 1842 Horn entered his first public office when James Duane Doty, Governor of the Wisconsin Territory, appointed him Justice of the Peace for Washington County. He also served as postmaster for Mequon, while he was residing there, and was Register of Deeds for the county in 1846 and 1847.

In 1848, he ran for and was elected to the first session of the Wisconsin State Senate, running as an independent Democrat. He was re-elected in November 1848 to a full two-year term in the Senate.[1]

In 1850, he was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly for the 1851 session, and was chosen as the Speaker of the Assembly for that session. In 1853, Ozaukee County was created out of the eastern part of Washington County. That same year, Horn was elected as one of the first two representatives of Ozaukee County in the Wisconsin Assembly for the 1854 session, he was again chosen as Speaker for that session.[1]

Later in 1854 and 1855, he served as Wisconsin’s Commissioner for Immigration in New York City, directing new immigrants and settlers to Wisconsin.[1]

He served again in the 1859 and 1860 sessions of the Wisconsin Assembly. Also during this time, he represented Wisconsin on the Democratic National Committee, and was Vice President of the 1860 Democratic National Conventions in Charleston and Baltimore. He was also a delegate for Wisconsin at the 1868 Democratic National Convention.[1]

He served as Ozaukee County Commissioner of Schools from 1862 to 1865, but returned to the Assembly again in 1867, 1868, and 1872. He was elected in 1874 with both Democratic and Republican support, and was then chosen as Speaker again for the 1875 session of the Assembly. He went on to serve another five years in the Assembly, in 1882, 1887, 1888, 1889, and 1890.[1]

In 1890, he was elected to a four-year term in the Wisconsin State Senate, but he would die in January 1893 before the end of that term.[2][3][4]

Horn was also active in local politics during this time, serving as Mayor of Cedarburg for the first seven years after it was incorporated as a city in 1885, and serving as Chairman of the Ozaukee County Board of Supervisors for the last four years of his life, from 1889 to 1893.[1]

Horn is the namesake of the community of Horns Corners, Wisconsin.[5]

. . . Frederick W. Horn . . .

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. . . Frederick W. Horn . . .

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