Makarska

Makarska is the main beach resort town along the Makarska Riviera in Croatia, south of Split. Behind the city the impressive Biokovo mountain range rises up to 1,700 m (5,575 ft) within a few kilometres from the sea.

. . . Makarska . . .

Makarska is on the picturesque Croatian coast. It is recommended to visit from April until October. For younger people July and August. If you want take a rest with no crowd on the beach then September is a good time. Makarska is a good place to stay rather than visiting on a day trip.

  • Regular regional bus service connects Makarska to Split, Dubrovnik, and other cities in the broader region.
  • In the season (June-August) there is a direct night connection to Banja Luka and Gradiska in the north of Bosnia.
  • There is a ferry to Sumartin on Brac-island; travelling time is around 30 min.

In Makarska there is no single large taxi company, but many small operators provide a service with one or two cars. The taxi usually comes within 10 to 15 min from the call.

You can take a scenic walk around the peninsula, the marina, and the main square. The peninsula area in particular is scenic, relaxing, and some parts are not too crowded. Be warned that nude sunbathers like to relax on the southern side of the peninsula.

  • Parasailing
  • Rafting and kayaking. About a half-hour drive from Makarska, you can go rafting or kayaking along the Cetina River. The river is generally calm, although there are a few fast places, and one section is particularly dangerous. There is a tour agency that offers guided trips down the river. If you decide to go, look for the cave that was used by Marshal Tito’s Partisans to hide from the Nazis during World War II.
  • Trekking. The mountains directly behind the city have decent hiking trails. The area is scenic and not too crowded, and you can get a good view of Makarska if you hike high enough. Be sure to stay on the trails and be aware that there is a species of poisonous snake that lives in the area.
  • Nature Park Biokovo. The mountain that rises right out of the sea, behind Makarska, with its peaks and lookout points that afford unforgettable panoramic views onto the Makarska Riviera and the area around Biokovo. Biokovo is unique not only for its position, but also for its geomorphology and its biological diversity, which are the main reasons for Mt Biokovo having been proclaimed a nature park in 1981. You can walk on foot into the mountains behind Makarska, however if you want to reach the best mountainous areas you will need to drive to the official park itself. There are excellent hiking opportunities in the park, although sometimes the fog makes it difficult to have a good view of the surroundings. 
  • Kotišina Botanical Garden, a part of the Nature park Biokovo that covers an area of 16.5 ha over the village of Kotišina. According to the intentions of its founder, Fra Jure Radić, the Biokovo vegetation, preserved in its original state, enables visitors to get to know the unique wild plant life of the area.

. . . Makarska . . .

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. . . Makarska . . .

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