Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon

The Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon, is a decoration of the United States Navy which was established on December 12, 2003 by order of Secretary of the NavyGordon R. England. The ribbon is retroactive to May 1, 2001. Service with the Guard or on board USS Constitution prior to this date does not qualify the member for the ribbon.[3]

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Award
Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon

The Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon
Type Ribbon
Presented by the Department of the Navy[1]
Eligibility Complete a standard tour of duty with the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard or on board USS Constitution.
Status Current
Established December 12, 2003 (2003-12-12) (as the “U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard Ribbon”)
January 17, 2012 (2012-01-17) (as the “Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon”)
First awarded Retroactive to May 1, 2001
Precedence
Next (higher) Navy Recruit Training Service Ribbon
Equivalent Navy Ceremonial Guard Ribbon (20032012)[2]
Next (lower) Armed Forces Reserve Medal

. . . Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon . . .

As of January 17, 2012 the name of the Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon was changed[4] from the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard Ribbon in order to encompass those personnel who have successfully completed a standard tour of duty on board USS Constitution. In this case the term successful is defined as completion of a tour of 24 months, completion of all required qualifications and maintaining outstanding personal appearance and a discipline free record. The ultimate award authority for the Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon is the commanding officer of USS Constitution, which is berthed at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Multiple awards of the Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon are denoted by bronze service stars, however only one award of the ribbon is authorized for each tour of duty.

U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard from the Naval District Washington, D.C. stand in formation for the Armed Forces Full Honor Farewell Review Ceremony in honor of the Secretary of Defense at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in January 2017.

The Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon is presented to those members of the U.S. Navy who, while stationed in Washington, D.C., complete a standard tour of duty with the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard. A standard tour is defined as at least two years of duty with no disciplinary action, above average evaluations, and adherence to physical and military bearing standards of the Navy Ceremonial Guard. Also must be in a “fallout” status for 18 months, and reach at least Standard Honors within a platoon (firing party, casket bearers, colors, or drill team).

The Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon is also awarded to members of the Naval Reserve who complete at least 18 months of successful drills as members of the Navy Ceremonial Guard. The term “successful drill” is defined as actual participation in ceremonies and funerals as casket bearers, firing party, color guard, ceremonial drill team, or as members of marching platoons. Reserve members of the Navy Ceremonial Guard are also bound by the same physical and military requirements as the active duty members and must maintain a discipline free record for the Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon to be awarded.

The ultimate award authority for the Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon is the commanding officer of the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard, which is headquartered at the Washington Navy Yard in the District of Columbia. Multiple awards of the Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon are denoted by bronze service stars, however only one award of the ribbon is authorized for each tour of duty.

. . . Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon . . .

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. . . Navy Ceremonial Duty Ribbon . . .

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