Greenlandic phrasebook

Greenlandic (Kalaallisut) is the main and since 2009 the sole official language of Greenland. It is an Eskimo–Aleut language, closely related to the Inuit languages in Canada such as Inuktitut.

There are quite big differences between dialects. The name Kalaallisut can refer either to the language or to the main variety, Western Greenlandic. Tunumiit oraasiat or East Greenlandic and Inuktun or Polar Eskimo are the other main varieties, the latter especially close to Inuktitut.

Greenlandic is a polysynthetic language that allows the creation of long words by stringing together roots and suffixes. Inflection is quite complex. Greenlandic usually constructs new words made from Greenlandic roots, by the very rich derivative mechanisms, but Greenlandic also has many loans from Danish and English.

. . . Greenlandic phrasebook . . .

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Hello. 
Haluu. ( )
Hello. (informal) 
Kutaa. ( )
How are you? 
Qanoq ippit?( ?)
Are you well/good? 
Ajunngilatit? ( )
Fine, thank you. 
Ajunngilanga, qujanaq. ( )
It’s good/fine. 
Ajunngilaq. ( )
What is your name? 
Qanoq ateqarpit? ( ?)
My name is ______ . 
______-mik ateqarpunga . ( _____ .)
Nice to meet you. 
. ( )
Please. 
. ( )
Thank you. 
Qujanaq. ( )
You’re welcome. (you too) 
Illillu. ( )
Yes. 
Aap/Aappi/Suu. ( )
No. 
Naa/Naamik. ( )
Maybe. 
Immaqa. ( )
Right? 
Ilaa? ( )
Excuse me. (getting attention) 
. ( )
Excuse me. (begging pardon) 
. ( )
I’m sorry. 
Utoqqatserpunga. ( )
Goodbye 
Baaj/Baj/Baabaj ( )
See you! 
Takuss!( )
I can’t speak name of language [well]. 
. ( [ ])
Do you speak English? 
Tuluttut oqaluttarpi? ( ?)
Is there someone here who speaks English? 
? ( ?)
Help! 
Ikiu! ( !)
Look out! 
Mianersorit! ( !)
Good morning. 
Kumoorn. ( )
Good afternoon 
. ( )
Good evening. 
. ( )
Good night. 
Kunaat. ( )
Good night (sleep well, to one person) 
Sinilluarit. ( )
I don’t understand. 
Paasinngilanga. ( )
Where is the toilet? 
Anartarfik sumiippa? ( ?)

In Greenland only 1–12 in Greenlandic are used. This is caused by a system of numerals used in the past where the toes and fingers were used to count to 20 which would be inuk naallugu or a complete human. 79 would be four complete humans minus one.

0 
nuulu, noor’lu (NOO-loo, NOR-loo)
1 
ataaseq (at-AR-sek)
2 
marluk (MAR-look)
3 
pingasut (PEEN-ga-soot)
4 
sisamat (SEE-sa-mat)
5 
tallimat (TAL-li-mat)
6 
arfineq (when counting and with time), arfinillit (when counting objects) (AR-feen-ek, ar-FEEN-eel-lit)
7 
arfineq marluk (AR-feen-ek MAR-look)
8 
arfineq pingasut (AR-feen-ek PEEN-ga-soot)
9 
(Northern Greenlandic) qulingiluat (counting/time), qualaaluat (objects) (kwel-LING-il-yoo-at, kwal-AA-loo-at)

(Southern Greenlandic) qulaaluat (kwul-AA-loo-at)

10 
qulit (kwulit)
11 
aqqaneq (counting/time), aqqanillit (objects) (AK-kan-ek, ak-KAN-eel-lit)

(Northern Greenlandic) isikkaneq (counting/time), isikkanillit (objects) (ISI-kan-ek, isi-kan-EEL-lit)

12 
aqqaneq marluk (AK-kan-ek MAR-look)

(North Greenlandic) isikkaneq marluk (ISI-kan-ek MAR-look)

The numerals after 12 are Danish now but 13–20 in old Greenlandic are underneath as well as 100 and 1000:

13 
aqqaneq pingasut (AK-kan-ek PEEN-ga-soot)
14 
aqqaneq sisamat (AK-kan-ek SEE-sa-mat)
15 
aqqaneq tallimat (AK-kan-ek TAL-lee-mat)
16 
arvirsanillit (arv-ER-san-eel-lit)
17 
arvirsani marluk (arv-ER-san-ee MAR-look)
18 
arvirsani pingasut (arv-ER-san-ee PEEN-ga-soot)
19 
arvirsani sisamat (arv-ER-san-ee SEE-sa-mat)
20 
arvirsani tallimat (arv-ER-san-ee TAL-lee-mat) or inuk naallugu (een-ook narl-loogoo)
100 
untriti (un-TREE-tee)
1000 
tuusinti (too-SEEN-tee)

. . . Greenlandic phrasebook . . .

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. . . Greenlandic phrasebook . . .

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