USS DeLong (TB-28)

USS DeLong (Torpedo Boat No. 28/TB-28/Coast Torpedo Boat No. 14) was a United States NavyBlakely class torpedo boat and minesweeper. DeLong (TB-28) was launched 23 November 1900 by George Lawley & Son, South Boston, Massachusetts; sponsored by Mrs. S. DeL. Mills, daughter of Lieutenant CommanderGeorge W. De Long; and commissioned 27 October 1902.

United States Navy torpedo boat
For other ships with the same name, see USS DeLong.

USS DeLong fitting out, 1 July 1901
History
United States
Name DeLong
Namesake Lieutenant CommanderGeorge W. De Long
Ordered 4 May 1898 (authorised)
Builder George Lawley & Son, South Boston, MA
Laid down 24 January 1899
Launched 23 November 1900
Commissioned 27 October 1902
Decommissioned 8 March 1919
Renamed
  • Coast Torpedo Boat No. 14,
  • 1 August 1918
Fate Sold for scrapping, 19 July 1920
General characteristics [1]
Class and type Blakely-classtorpedo boat
Displacement 196 long tons (199 t)[2]
Length 175 ft (53 m)
Beam 17 ft 8 in (5.38 m)
Draft 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m) (mean)[2]
Installed power
Propulsion
Speed
  • 26 kn (30 mph; 48 km/h)
  • 25.52 kn (29.37 mph; 47.26 km/h) (Speed on Trial)[2]
Complement 29 officers and enlisted
Armament 3 × 1-pounder, 3 × 18 inch (450 mm)torpedo tubes

Between 4 November 1902 and 2 July 1906, the DeLong was assigned to the Reserve Torpedo Flotilla at Norfolk, Virginia, then was returned to full commission for torpedo practice and training along the Atlantic coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. Again out of commission between 7 August 1909 and 30 April 1910, this time at Boston, the DeLong was in reserve at Charleston from 20 May 1910, going to sea occasionally to maintain her readiness for action. She lay in ordinary between 14 March 1914 and 7 April 1917, when upon the entry of the United States into World War I, she was recommissioned and fitted out as a minesweeper.

The DeLong was based on Norfolk for minesweeping duty until 2 May 1918, when she sailed for Halifax, Nova Scotia, and patrol duty with the Submarine Chaser Flotilla. She also escorted seaplanes to sea for the Naval Aero Squadron based at Halifax, and from 1 August 1918 was known as Coast Torpedo Boat No. 14. She returned from Halifax to Boston 18 January 1919, and arrived at Philadelphia 4 February. There she was decommissioned 8 March 1919 and sold for scrapping 19 July 1920.

. . . USS DeLong (TB-28) . . .

  1. “USS DeLong (TB-28)”. Navsource.org. Retrieved 8 July 2015.
  2. “Table 10 – Ships on Navy List June 30, 1919”. Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office: 714. 1921.
  • Eger, Christopher L. (March 2021). “Hudson Fulton Celebration, Part II”. LVIII (1): 58–81. ISSN 0043-0374. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  • Sieche, Erwin F. (1990). “Austria-Hungary’s Last Visit to the USA”. Warship International. XXVII (2): 142–164. ISSN 0043-0374.
  • This article incorporates text from the public domainDictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.
  • Technical data fromGardiner, Robert (1979). Conway’s All the World’s Fighting Ships 1860–1905. Conway Maritime Press. p. 162. ISBN 0-85177-133-5.
The ship under construction at the George Lawley & Son shipyard
 United States Navy

. . . USS DeLong (TB-28) . . .

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. . . USS DeLong (TB-28) . . .

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