1469 Linzia

1469 Linzia, provisional designation 1938 QD, is a dark asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 60 kilometers in diameter. Discovered by Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in 1938, the asteroid was later named after the Austrian city of Linz.

1469 Linzia
Discovery[1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 19 August 1938
Designations
(1469) Linzia
Pronunciation /ˈlɪntsiə/
Named after
Linz(Austrian city)[2]
1938 QD · 1931 JD
1933 SM1 · 1936 FC1
1949 OP1 · 1955 ST
1955 UB · A916 QD
main-belt · (outer)[3]
background[4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 86.40 yr (31,556 days)
Aphelion 3.3312 AU
Perihelion 2.9148 AU
3.1230 AU
Eccentricity 0.0667
5.52 yr (2,016 days)
52.444°
0° 10m 42.96s / day
Inclination 13.398°
188.96°
207.33°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 54.30±16.67 km[5]
58.78 km (derived)[3]
58.99±2.5 km[6]
59.021±0.518 km[7]
66.05±21.19 km[8]
67.66±0.80 km[9]
74.78±0.36 km[10]
6.067h(poor)[11]
12 h (poor)[12]
15.2±0.2 h[12]
22.215±0.004 h[13]
0.038±0.006[10]
0.056±0.002[9]
0.0561 (derived)[3]
0.06±0.04[5][8]
0.0733±0.0123[7]
0.0734±0.007[6]
P[7] · C(assumed)[3]
9.10±0.83[14] · 9.60[6][7][9] · 9.80[5][10] · 9.9[1][3] · 9.94[8]

    . . . 1469 Linzia . . .

    Linzia was discovered on 19 August 1938, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at the Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory in southwest Germany.[15] Twelve nights later, the asteroid was independently discovered by Soviet astronomer Grigory Neujmin at the Simeiz Observatory, Crimea, on 31 August 1938.[2] The Minor Planet Center only recognizes the first discoverer.[15] The asteroid was first identified as A916 QD at Simeiz in August 1916, or 22 years prior to its official discovery.[15]

    Linzia is a non-family asteroid from the main belt’s background population.[4] It orbits the Sun in the outer asteroid belt at a distance of 2.9–3.3 AU once every 5 years and 6 months (2,016 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.07 and an inclination of 13° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body’s observation arc begins at the discovering Heidelberg Observatory in May 1931, when it was identified as 1931 JD.[15]

    . . . 1469 Linzia . . .

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    . . . 1469 Linzia . . .

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